Conceptual Illustrator Jake Hawkins

Conceptual Illustrator Jake Hawkins


Jake Hawkins is 21 year old emerging conceptual illustrator. He is based in UK and soon to be graduate from Falmouth University. Jake’s illustrative style is a combination of representational outcomes and conceptual ideas, married together in a clean aesthetic. He primarily works within the realms of editorial and publishing. He enjoys best, producing work that tackles difficult subjects, or that which promotes universal equality. Jake Hawkins has initiated several projects revolving around LGBTQ+ issues and racial inequality! Visual communication is a powerful resource. Through his illustrations he wants his audience to question what they’re seeing and why. Visual metaphors are an integral component of his work. His illustrative style is, as idea-based as it is visual.

I asked Jake, How does he choose his themes and Inspirations, and here is what he told me.

J.H. My themes come from wanting to produce work I’m passionate about, oftentimes vocalizing a powerful message or one that helps elucidate concepts which are difficult to grasp. I find inspiration from all manner of sources, sometimes my own lived experiences, or from those closest to me. More often, though, than not, it comes from activists and public intellects who teach me something which I then translate visually.

Below are some of Jake Hawkins’ projects and their brief. If you want to see more of his work, visit Jake Hawkins Portfolio.

“Faces of Pride”

“Faces of Pride” was created in support of Pride Month, showcasing the diversity of the LGBTQ+ community, in a fun and playful way.

“Why White People Need Blackface”


“Why White People Need Blackface” is another speculative editorial piece Jake created in response to George Yancy’s article in The New York Times. George Yancy is Jake’s favourite author who has been fortunate to communicate with. Quite simply white people need blackface in order to reaffirm the racist lies, stereotypes, and caricatures that have been placed on non-white bodies. Jake’s illustration was created to accompany George Yancy’s powerful comment, “To understand this degrading practice, we must examine the white face that refuses to see itself in its own monstrous creations.” 

 

“The Woman with 100 Personalities”

“The Woman with 100 Personalities” is a speculative editorial piece that details visually the experience of living with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). The metaphor of the Russian dolls has been employed by the illustrator to visually decode the experience.

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